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What is the best software to use to record a high-quality remote group podcast with good sound quality and minimal interruptions?

Human voices produce sound waves at frequencies between 80 Hz and 255 Hz, which is why most podcast recording software focuses on capturing this range for clear audio.

The double-ender method of remote podcast recording, where each participant records individually and files are later merged, can reduce echo and latency issues.

Noise reduction algorithms in recording software use spectral subtraction, a technique that identifies and subtracts unwanted frequencies from the audio signal.

Dynamic range compression, a feature in many podcast recording software, reduces the difference between loud and quiet sounds, making the audio more consistent.

The Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem states that a sampling rate of at least twice the highest frequency of the audio signal is required to accurately capture it, which is why most podcast recording software samples at 44.1 kHz or higher.

When using video conferencing software for remote podcast recording, the audio is often compressed, which can affect sound quality; dedicated podcast recording software avoids this issue.

Many podcast recording software platforms use WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communication) protocols to enable real-time communication and streaming.

Audio latency, a delay between the time a person speaks and when their voice is heard by others, can be reduced using technologies like WebRTC and UDP (User Datagram Protocol) transmission.

The human brain can detect audio latency as small as 10-15 ms, making it essential to minimize latency in remote podcast recording.

Some podcast recording software uses lossless audio compression, like FLAC or WAV, to preserve the original quality of the recorded audio.

The bit depth of an audio file, typically 16-bit or 24-bit, determines the dynamic range of the audio, with higher bit depths allowing for more detail and less noise.

The sample rate of an audio file, typically 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz, determines the frequency range that can be captured, with higher sample rates allowing for more accurate capture of high frequencies.

Using a Pop Filter, a simple mesh screen, can reduce plosive sounds and improve audio quality by reducing air bursts when speaking.

The frequency response of a microphone, typically between 20 Hz and 20,000 Hz, affects the tone and quality of the recorded audio.

In remote podcast recording, using headphones can help reduce echo, feedback, and bleed from other audio sources, resulting in a cleaner and more professional-sounding recording.

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